News and Announcements

Somerset County High School Students have their Art Work on Display at the Mosely Gallery at UMES.

Washington High School (WHS) and Crisfield High School(CHS) art students will have their art on display at the Mosely Gallery at UMES until February 7. A large number of high school students from lower shore high schools and their parents attended at the initial showing and reception on Thursday, January 24 from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm. According to our art teacher, many students and parents attended the reception. They said there was a large group of people in attendance that evening. Art teachers Jeremy Holland (CHS) Sarah Perdue (WHS) and Scott Smith (WHS) have encouraged several talented students to have their work on display. Click on the title for more information.
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Our School System has 3rd Highest KRA Scores in the State

When discussing the academic readiness of incoming Kindergarten students, Coordinator of Early Childhood Education for Somerset County Public Schools Karen Karten said, “This is really good news for us.” She said scores on the KRA indicate, “Sixty% of our kindergarteners enter with the foundational skills in place to begin Kindergarten work. Of course we wish this were 100% but 60% shows a steady improvement. 25% approaching means that 25% of the students coming into Kindergarten were nearly ready with some foundational skills and 15% were emerging, meaning that they display minimal foundational skills. We are third in the state. Though the state doesn’t report on domains, I can tell you that we saw a 15-20% increase in the academic domains this year as well!” Click on the title for more information.
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School System Responds to New Report Card

SOMERSET COUNTY, Md. – School Districts across the Eastern Shore are now sifting through Maryland’s brand new rating system, including Somerset County.

“Anytime you give greater criteria, you give greater opportunities to show strengths rather than one indicator,” explains Superintendent Dr. John Gaddis. Maryland’s new public school rating system isn’t just about test scores, it’s a new way to measure success. And for Somerset County, it’s proving their students are right in line with others throughout the state despite their unique challenges.

“The fact that we can have the highest poverty setting in the state and our students can achieve means we’re removing that barrier.” All of the schools in Somerset County received three and four star ratings. Ratings that Dr. Gaddis says prove their efforts across the board are working.

“I think overall we’re pleased because we’ve had a focus on early childhood, we’ve also had a focus on educating the whole child so when you look at the incentives we’ve done for attendance rates when you look at what we’ve done for graduation rates at the high school level, when you look at the intervention we put in with testing,” Gaddis continues, “Of course we want our testing scores to be higher, but when you have students that are coming to school you should be rewarded for that. Because school is not always a positive for some of our students and the fact that they’re coming and that they’re working with us is a positive. We were just happy really across the whole board.”
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Dr. Gaddis is the 2019 Maryland Superintendent of the Year

Ocean City (October 25, 2018) It was announced Thursday evening that Somerset County Public Schools’ Superintendent Dr. John B. Gaddis has been selected as the Maryland Superintendent of the Year. The Superintendent of the Year is chosen annually by a panel of other Maryland superintendents following an extensive application process. The winner then goes on to represent the state in the National Superintendent of the Year process, all of which is a program of AASA: The American Association of School Administrators. The announcement was made at the concluding banquet of the Maryland Negotiation Service (MNS) Conference, an affiliate of the Public School Superintendents Association of Maryland (PSSAM). Click on the title for more information and several photographs.
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Dr. Richard Warren is the 2018-2019 Maryland Teacher of the Year.

Statewide Winner is from Somerset County

BALTIMORE (October 12, 2018) – Dr. Richard Warren, Jr., an eighth grade Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) teacher at Somerset County’s Crisfield High School and Academy, tonight was named the 2018-2019 Maryland Teacher of the Year.

Dr. Karen Salmon, State Superintendent of Schools, made the announcement at the 28th Annual Teacher of the Year Gala. The event attracted educators and dignitaries, such as Lt. Governor Boyd Rutherford, Sen. Chris Van Hollen, and former Sen. Paul Sarbanes.

Richard has taught for six years, the last five at Crisfield High School and Academy. He holds three degrees from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore: a bachelor of science degree in science (2011); masters of arts in teaching (2014) and a doctorate in educational leadership (2018).

STEM education is Richard’s passion. He looks to inspire, connect, and help students stretch their potential through technology and relatable learning experiences.

“Teaching is so much more than content,” he said. “Teaching is about reaching students where they are, connecting them to real-world experiences, and equipping them with the necessary knowledge and skills to lead and make a difference in life.”

Governor Larry Hogan and Lt. Governor Boyd Rutherford congratulated Maryland’s new Teacher of the Year. Click on the title for more information and great photographs.
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Board Approves Change in the 2018-2019 Academic Calendar

At its monthly meeting tonight October 16, 2018, the Board of Education approved a change in the 2018-2019 Academic Calendar. November 21 will now be a half day of school with early dismissal instead of a day with the school system being totally closed. Three inclement weather days were built into the calendar at its approval date of August 21. We have missed two days already because of inclement weather and high water on many of the roads. A statement on the original calendar indicates November 21, January 21, February 18, April 18 and May 27 are potential make-up days. If we miss more than three days that were built into the calendar, we have to show local effort by using one of the aforementioned days. We cannot get a waiver on other days if we have not shown local effort. Given the fact the school system has been closed an average annually of 6-7 days for the last number of years, the Board made this decision to be proactive.
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